Event Details


Title:Collision with Trees and Crash Short of the Runway, Corporate Airlines Flight 5966, BAE Systems BAE-J3201, N875JX, Kirksville, Missouri, October 19, 2004
Micro summary:This BAE Systems BAE-J3201 landed short of the runway.
Event Time:2004-10-19 at 1937 CDT
File Name:2004-10-19-US.pdf
Publishing Agency:National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB)
Publishing Country:USA
Report number:NTSB/AAR-06/01
Pages:110
Site of event:Landing, short of runway 36 at IRK, 1.2 nm sourth
Departure:Lambert Saint Louis International Airport, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
Destination:Kirksville Regional Airport, Kirskville, Missouri
Airplane Type(s):BAe-J3201
Flight Phase:Approach
Registration(s):N875JX
Operator(s):American Connection (Corporate Airlines)
Type of flight:Revenue
Occupants:15
Fatalities:13
Serious Injuries:2
Minor/Non-Injured:0
Other Injuries:0
Executive Summary:Abstract: This report explains the accident involving Corporate Airlines flight 5966, a BAE Systems BAE-J3201, N875JX, that crashed short of the runway on approach to land at Kirksville Regional Airport, Kirksville, Missouri. Safety issues in this report focus on operational and human factors issues, including the pilotsí professionalism and sterile cockpit procedures, nonprecision instrument approach procedures, flight and duty time regulations, fatigue, and flight data/image recorder requirements.

Executive Summary On October 19, 2004, about 1937 central daylight time, Corporate Airlines (doing business as American Connection) flight 5966, a BAE Systems BAE-J3201, N875JX, struck trees on final approach and crashed short of runway 36 at the Kirksville Regional Airport (IRK), Kirksville, Missouri. The flight was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 as a scheduled passenger flight from Lambert-St. Louis International Airport, in St. Louis, Missouri, to IRK. The captain, first officer, and 11 of the 13 passengers were fatally injured, and 2 passengers received serious injuries. The airplane was destroyed by impact and a postimpact fire. Night instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed at the time of the accident, and the flight operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of the accident was the pilotsí failure to follow established procedures and properly conduct a nonprecision instrument approach at night in IMC, including their descent below the minimum descent altitude (MDA) before required visual cues were available (which continued unmoderated until the airplane struck the trees) and their failure to adhere to the established division of duties between the flying and nonflying (monitoring) pilot.

Contributing to the accident was the pilotsí failure to make standard callouts and the current Federal Aviation Regulations that allow pilots to descend below the MDA into a region in which safe obstacle clearance is not assured based upon seeing only the airport approach lights. The pilotsí unprofessional behavior during the flight and their fatigue likely contributed to their degraded performance.

The safety issues in this report focus on operational and human factors issues, including the pilotsí professionalism and sterile cockpit procedures, nonprecision instrument approach procedures, flight and duty time regulations, fatigue, and flight data/image recorder requirements.
Learning Keywords:Operations - Airspace - Non-Precision Approach
Operations - Crew Resource Management
Operations - In-flight Collision with Ground Structure
Operations - Runway Underrun
Other - Crew Fatigue
Other - Regulatory Oversight
Other - Workplace Culture or Management
Consequence - Hull Loss

 




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