Event Details


Title:Runway overrun, Executive Airlines (doing business as American Eagle) Flight 5401, Avions de Transport Regional 72-212, N438AT, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 9, 2004
Micro summary:This ATR-72 bounced twice, then overran the runway.
Event Time:2004-05-09 at 1450 Atlantic ST
File Name:2004-05-09-US.pdf
Publishing Agency:National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB)
Publishing Country:USA
Report number:NTSB/AAR-05/02
Pages:118
Site of event:4317 feet from runway 08 threshold
Departure:Eugenio Maria de Hostos Airport (MAZ), Mayaguez, Puero Rico
Destination:Luis Muoz Marn International Airport, San Juan, Puerto Rico
Airplane Type(s):ATR 72-212
Flight Phase:Landing
Registration(s):N438AT
Operator(s):American Eagle (Executive Airlines)
Type of flight:Revenue
Occupants:26
Fatalities:0
Serious Injuries:20
Minor/Non-Injured:6
Other Injuries:0
Executive Summary:Abstract: This report explains the accident involving Executive Airlines (doing business as American Eagle) flight 5401, an Avions de Transport Regional 72-212, which skipped once, bounced hard twice, and then crashed at Luis Muoz Marin International Airport, San Juan, Puerto Rico. Safety issues discussed in this report focus on flight crew performance, the lack of company bounced landing recovery guidance and training, and malfunctioning flight data recorder potentiometer sensors. Safety recommendations concerning these issues are addressed to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Executive Summary On May 9, 2004, about 1450 Atlantic standard time, Executive Airlines (doing business as American Eagle) flight 5401, an Avions de Transport Regional 72-212, N438AT, skipped once, bounced hard twice, and then crashed at Luis Munoz Marin International Airport, San Juan, Puerto Rico. The airplane came to a complete stop on a grassy area about 217 feet left of the runway 8 centerline and about 4,317 feet beyond the runway threshold. The captain was seriously injured; the first officer, 2 flight attendants, and 16 of the 22 passengers received minor injuries; and the remaining 6 passengers received no injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 as a scheduled passenger flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of this accident was the captain's failure to execute proper techniques to recover from the bounced landings and his subsequent failure to execute a go-around.

The safety issues in this report include flight crew performance, the lack of company bounced landing recovery guidance and training, and malfunctioning flight data recorder potentiometer sensors. Safety recommendations concerning bounced landing recovery guidance and training and flight control surface position sensors are addressed to the Federal Aviation Administration.
Learning Keywords:Operations - Bounce
Operations - Crew Resource Management
Operations - Runway Overrun
Operations - Unstabilized Approach
Consequence - Damage - Airframe or fuselage

 




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