Event Details


Title:Loss of Control and Impact With Terrain, Aviation Charter, Inc., Raytheon (Beechcraft) King Air A100, N41BE, Eveleth, Minnesota, October 25, 2002
Micro summary:This Beechcraft King Air A100 crashed short of the runway during a VOR approach.
Event Time:2002-10-25 at 1022 CDT
File Name:2002-10-25-US.pdf
Publishing Agency:National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB)
Publishing Country:USA
Report number:NTSB/AAR-03/03
Pages:76
Site of event:1.8 nm southeast of the approach end of RWY 27
Latitude/Longitude:N4724.36' W9227.05'
Departure:St. Paul Downtown Airport, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
Destination:Eveleth-Virginia Municipal Airport, Eveleth, Minnesota, USA
Airplane Type(s):Raytheon (Beechcrat) King Air A100
Flight Phase:Approach
Registration(s):N41BE
Operator(s):Aviaton Charter, Inc.
Type of flight:Revenue
Occupants:8
Fatalities:8
Serious Injuries:0
Minor/Non-Injured:0
Other Injuries:0
Executive Summary:Abstract: This report explains the accident involving Aviation Charter, Inc., which crashed while the flight crew was attempting to execute the VOR approach to runway 27 at Eveleth-Virginia Municipal Airport, Eveleth, Minnesota, on October 25, 2002. The safety issues discussed in this report include flight crew proficiency, Aviation Charter operational and training issues, inadequate crew resource management (CRM) training, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) surveillance, and the need for improved low-airspeed awareness. Safety recommendations concerning CRM training, FAA surveillance, and low-airspeed alert systems are addressed to the FAA.

Executive Summary On October 25, 2002, about 1022 central daylight time, a Raytheon (Beechcraft) King Air A100, N41BE, operated by Aviation Charter, Inc., crashed while the flight crew was attempting to execute the VOR approach to runway 27 at Eveleth-Virginia Municipal Airport, Eveleth, Minnesota. The crash site was located about 1.8 nautical miles southeast of the approach end of runway 27. The two pilots and six passengers were killed, and the airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a postcrash fire. The airplane was being operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as an on-demand passenger charter flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of this accident was the flight crew's failure to maintain adequate airspeed, which led to an aerodynamic stall from which they did not recover.

The safety issues discussed in this report include flight crew proficiency, Aviation Charter operational and training issues, inadequate crew resource management (CRM) training, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) surveillance, and the need for improved low-airspeed awareness. Safety recommendations concerning CRM training, FAA surveillance, and low-airspeed alert systems are addressed to the FAA.
Learning Keywords:Operations - Airspace - Non-Precision Approach
Operations - Crew Resource Management
Operations - Uncontrolled Flight into Terrain
Other - Regulatory Oversight
Other - Workplace Culture or Management
Consequence - Hull Loss

 




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